Origin: (Robert Langdon Book 5)

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Sunday Times # 1 Bestseller
New York Times # 1 Bestseller

The worldwide bestseller - Origin is the current Robert Langdon book from the author of The Da Vinci Code.


'Fans will not be disappointed' The Times


Robert Langdon, Harvard teacher of symbology and spiritual iconology, comes to the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao to participate in the unveiling of an impressive scientific development. The night's host is billionaire Edmond Kirsch, a futurist whose amazing state-of-the-art inventions and adventurous predictions have made him a controversial figure around the globe.

Langdon and several hundred guests are left reeling when the meticulously orchestrated night is suddenly blown apart. There is a real threat that Kirsch's valuable discovery may be lost in the occurring turmoil. With his life under danger, Langdon is forced into a desperate bid to get away Bilbao, taking with him the museum's director, Ambra Vidal. Together they run away to Barcelona on a perilous mission to locate a puzzling password that will open Kirsch's secret.To avert a devious enemy who is one action ahead of them at every turn, Langdon and Vidal must browse the labyrinthine passages of extreme religious beliefs and covert history. On a path marked just by enigmatic signs and elusive contemporary art, Langdon and Vidal will come face-to-face with a breathtaking reality that has actually stayed buried-- previously.


'Dan Brown is the master of the intellectual cliffhanger' Wall Street Journal
'As engaging a hero as you might want' Mail on Sunday
'For anybody who wants more brain-food than thrillers normally provide' Sunday Times

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